Category Archives: vegetarianism

VeganHood TV Episode 2 “Health is Wealth” 3/4

Just out. The warrior Mental Sun and friends keep workinonit. Enjoy! Thanks brotha Mental Sun!

Science of Sea Level Rise – via Explorations (+ Permaculture info)

Dr. Michio Kaku interviews Dr. Peter Ward

So you can click above to hear today’s (July 7, 2010) edition of one of my favorite radio shows, Explorations with Dr. Michio Kaku, professor of theoretical physics here at City College and CUNY Graduate Center, heard every Wednesday at 5pm on 99.5FM WBAI, or wbai.org.

I liked today’s show, in which Dr. Kaku interviews Dr. Peter Ward, professor of Biology and Earth and Space sciences at University of Washington. Dr. Ward just came out with a book called The Flooded Earth: Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps. Dr. Ward is seen as one of the scarier, worst-case scenario climatological and geological predictors, but it’s critical for folks, particularly youth, to get worried, especially about doing nothing – from personal life choices to public policy advocacy and activism – about greenhouse gas emissions. I’m always raring to find out about the worst possibilities and outcomes of our civilization’s current modus operandi so I can stay sufficiently paranoid and motivated to change this whole game around with a few friends. I stopped paying attention to good news long ago, because most of it (from the mainstream media) is meaningless, insignificant or untrue, so we have to go and make good news in our own lives and communities, in the real world. Informed by the hard science, no matter how good or bad it reveals things to be.

Another great show I heard today (I admit, it was a radio day) in between writing and a sweaty-ass work out was today’s Global Medicine Review with Dr. Kamau Kokayi (also on WBAI, every Wednesday at 12 noon). He interviewed Andrew Faust about permaculture, waste management and composting, sustainability, pollution, nature-deficit, eco-villages, and so on, to enlightening effect.

Get informed! Get the evidence! Use a wide variety of sources! Here are just two.

Relationship to veganism? We know that livestock production is responsible for at least 18% of greenhouse gas emissions according to the FAO and up to 51% according to the Worldwatch Institute (Treehugger breaks it down here). Plus the transportation of killed animals, the destruction of old-growth forests all over the world for grazing land (which absorb carbon dioxide), and so on. Raw vegans? Burn much less fossil fuels per capita. Fruitarians and low-fat raw vegans? Eat largely of trees and vines, the most productive and sustainable kinds of crops. Know that your unvolunteered dead chunk of muscle and fat from a fellow mammal, bird or fish, coming to you through torture, slavery and capitalism, is helping melt glaciers, ice sheets and ice shelves. Meat consumption may help flood the coasts of the world.

Please, if you haven’t yet, GO VEGAN. Go vegan, walk/ ride a bicycle and use mass transit as much as possible, become a revolutionary activist with a thoughtful collective and beyond, grow your own food at home AND with community gardens, pay attention to evidence and practice science, and stay that way. I’m an East Coast boy (I’m coastal however you look at it, from the Niger Delta to Upper New York Bay). I plan on being around well past 2050, maybe raising some grandbabies by then if all goes well. Hope they can inherit something decent of the Earth come the latter decades of this century and into the next.

Yes, veganism is part of the ongoing human revolution and evolution for an egalitarian, communitarian, tolerant, sustainable, humane, healthy society. Do it! Stop with meat-eating! Stop it right now! If you give a damn about your health and the Earth’s, learn to love the plant-based diet and cease your unnatural meat addiction. I mean it!

Don’t forget to listen to or download today’s Explorations! And Global Medicine Review! And go vegan if you’re not there yet!

Raw “Tacos,” or the Nigerian

This past weekend I made some raw tacos, but I don’t wanna call them that. So I figure, why not just call it the “Nigerian“? Or the “Nigerian Sandwich“? Culture is invented every day. And I have both a Nigerian and a US passport (despite the fact that I was born, raised and spent 99% of my life in New Jersey and New York City). Since this particular style is original (there are other raw “tacos” but none are exactly like these) and a dual citizen (or at least dual passport holder) made them (who can legally claim Nigerianity or Nigeriosity by parentage alone), why not? Why not call this one for the whole Nigerian world? If one Nigerian can invent and enjoy a raw vegan so-called taco or burrito, all Nigerians can. Nigeria is not a static and rigid and ultra-conservative society of maddening corruption and sickeningly needless, manmade underdevelopment, where vegetarians are unheard of. It also includes, at least in theory since I do have a Nigerian passport, wild ubuntuist atheist anarcho-syndicalist raw-vegan pro-black gentlemen like me that ride bikes, write books and do kettlebells. And as of today, it also includes raw vegan tacos. We all know about Jolof rice, named after a whole ethnic group – the Wolof people – in Senegal. Now we have something even bigger – “the Nigerian.”

Also, the “Raw Okra Stew” I’ve talked about earlier? Forget that name. I am now calling it “the Green Garvey.” Copyright the Precision Afrikan 2010, if necessary. Wait, no, “Creative” Copyright (CC), right? And it’s all 100% open-source. See? Nigeria isn’t all about the lack of government transparency.

And to the thought police goblins, don’t get your undergarments all in a wedgie over this, claiming iconoclasm or unpatrioticness – I’m just trying to rebrand Nigeria like Dora Akunyili.

New traditions, baby, new traditions, all day. Pro-human, pro-planet, art, music, poetry and literature from sun-up to sun-down. Wanna enjoy the new world, the new Pan-African, Pan-American, Virgo Supercluster vision of celebrations and saxophone horns that can be heard, yes indeed, in the vacuum of space (well at least in low-Earth orbit)? Then you must become mighty healthy. The Nigerian will help you on that path.

The ingredients are:

A) The taco build –

Big leaves of collards

A nice big red cabbage

Carrots

Okra!!!!

Snow peas

Zucchini

Tomatoes

And any other damn vegetable thing you like. Cukes, avos, sprouts, bell pepper, whatever.

B) The sauce, blended in a blender

Tomatoes – like five or six plum tomatoes in my case

An onion

Fresh basil

Fresh cilantro

An habañero pepper, aka “heat rock”

And whatever else you’d like, don’t be dogmatic – read beyond the letter of the script.

So what do you do? You blend your sauce. You could use a bicycle blender to save electricity. I don’t have one of those yet. But that’s the most basic step. Then, with a bowl of that sauce handy, and after you’ve washed all your veggies, you build your tac– erm, Nigerians.

How’s that go? I start with a big, massive leaf of a collard. Open that up and spread some of the sauce on it. Then, peel off a nice thick purple leaf of the red cabbage for the second leaf which forms the inner “bun.” Spread a spoon of your sauce on top of this, too. Then, you add your veggies. Now I sliced the zucchinis into thin pasta strips with my trusty julienne slicer, and peeled my carrots into wafer-thin strips with my reliable vegetable peeler. On all the tacos, after laying down the buns, the first joints I drop in there are a handful of zucchini strips. Then come the snow peas, a few okras (lob off the tips of those), the carrot slices, and finally a few tomatoes. And last, I dribble some more sauce across the top. And then I repeat, making enough of these to exhaust my supplies and satisfy my hunger. Other than fruits, it was my main “supper” the whole weekend.

Extremely satisfactory and delicious, and very filling. At least to me. And my taste-buds aren’t that unusual. The minions of anti-veganism may fear the “blandness” of plants. As the great DJ Dirty Harry (Rockers) once said, Remove Ya! I and I come and change the mood! Get into this real food.

Try it out. Let this crazy rasta know what you think.

And now, the porn (Nigerian porn):

These joints look like Nigeria though, right? Especially if you’ve ever been down to my area, the Niger Delta. Greenness everywhere. I’m not that far off.

New traditions, baby, new traditions, all day. Global citizens of hip-hop veganism and reggae revolution topped with ragas can now relish the Nigerian.

An Interview

The good folks over at La Terre d’abord or Earth First in France requested an e-mail interview with me the other day and sent over some good questions. Here are my responses, in case you won’t be able to understand it by the time it’s translated into French on their side. Please let me know what you think of these ideas – I’d really like some discussion and building out of this one.

—————————-

Comment allez vous?

Here is a response for our interview:

1.What is your website about?

“Afrikan Raw Vegan Talk” basically seeks to demonstrate that black vegans, including black raw vegans in particular, exist, are becoming visible, and are having relevant experiences and success as vegans across the African world, whether on the continent or in the diaspora. It also seeks to actualize and document the notion that being African and vegan is a critical and progressive part of our liberation struggle and the desire to humanize our existence while cherishing our singular and delicate planet.

2.How did you come about it?

I’ve been a vegan for eleven years now, and when I started this website in early 2008 I wanted to see more black vegan presence and commentary on the Internet, especially from the perspective of experienced, long-term, confident and determined vegans of color, not only blog diaries of 30-day trial vegans trying to lose weight, even though that is important as well. This blog represents an anti-imperialist, anti-capitalist, anti-white supremacy, humanist, activist, radical environmentalist, Pan-Africanist, African-centered and third-world perspective that is hardcore, straight-edge and long on the scene. This is third-world veganism that is very engaged with society from the perspective that revolution is necessary and veganism is an empowering and liberating part of the human transformation necessary for the survival and progress of this primate species.

3.How do you see the culture that developped in Black Africa as connected to veganism?

I am not a practicing archaeologist or anthropologist in this matter, but much anecdotal and historical evidence presents some of the people of Kemet, also known as Ancient Egyptians, as vegetarians. In general, pre-colonial diets where of whole foods, whether or not meat was included, and pre-colonial lifestyles in many parts of black Africa were seen, by Western anthropologists of the time (mid-19th century), as among the healthiest in the world. Now our life-spans and quality of life are the shortest and most miserable, largely due to neo-colonialism, neo-liberalism and rule by criminal governments. We are aid-dependent, and land tenure in Africa is at a state of perpetual crisis, while cash-crops prioritize growing cacao, coffee, and flowers over food. We even sell immense hectares of land to foreign countries for them to grow food for their own populations! Animal pastoralism is another problem, destroying vegetation across vast swaths of land and accelerating desertification. If all that land grew fruits and vegetables, many of our dietary and food security problems could begin to find resolution. And all these tendencies greatly exacerbate gender inequality as women struggle to grow kitchen gardens to feed families and tend to the crucial but totally unpaid task of reproductive labor, while men tend to focus on cash-crops and preferentially receive implements and resources from governments, multinationals and some NGOs to grow them.

Overall, transitioning towards veganism in Africa will ease malnutrition, raise production levels, increase self-sufficiency and I think reduce tendencies towards conflict and needless aggression. In terms of food policy, we can grow so much of our own fresh fruits and vegetables, organically and sustainably, if we focus on that goal at the continental and grassroots levels. In terms of societal outcomes, I think veganism improves social tolerance, physical well-being, reduces stress, makes the brain work more efficiently, improves immunity and reduces illness, reduces cancer levels, and so on. People will be more cooperative and conscientious of proper land stewardship and societal responsibility and cohesion in a vegan society – at least. Veganism in Africa would probably be far more revolutionary than that.

4.In France, we have people of african origin, and they are in a way or another culturally connected to Africa. But if the elders have often a very wise point of view, a very critical one, which stress that justice will necessary prevail even if it will take time, young people are quite far away from veganism and from a cultural critical stance of what we may call Babylone. What do you think about that?

I have faith in the youth. I’m 26 years old. I’m still considered a youth. I would almost say I have more faith in youth than in the old generation, which in many ways have failed us, failing to realize the promises of Pan-Africanism or Civil Rights. It’s young people who are becoming vegans, who are becoming critical thinkers, who are questioning the old ways and rightfully disposing with useless traditions that have no value and make no sense. I don’t have an innate respect for tradition, personally. I say, choose reason over custom. Babylon includes not only white-supremacist and capitalist society, but also anti-human, divisive, anti-intellectual, reactionary, authoritarian, homophobic, misogynistic and stupid traditions and tendencies in Africa and the black world. Many black youth are lost, many youth are hopeless, due to the failings of society which lead them to go after what they need at the expense of each other. The self-hate, ignorance and poverty at the root of the lives of the youth lead to many poor outcomes, which are all too visible. Less visible are the visionary youth, the revolutionary youth, the organized youth building art, building armies of wisdom and change. But I think the visionary youth hold the reigns of the future and will courageously confront the immense challenges of the present and near future, mostly given us by our often greedy, stubborn and foolish parents and grandparents.

5.In France, when we think about revolutionary afrikan position in North America, we think about Move or Dead Prez. Nevertheless, we would have a criticism: it seems that a poisonless perspective was the central aspect, not really nature, the animals, the Earth. What would you say to that?

For Africans, there is little time to focus on animal liberation alone. It makes no sense, when humans are in so much misery. Someone like me could never get behind the white animal liberation scene, because they act like it is the central problem of injustice in the world, which from my perspective is absurd and laughable. Oppressed people start at the perspective of their own oppression. Of course, everything else is included when we consider the foul human trends that lead to all kinds of exploitation. Aggression, greed, ignorance, violence, dominion – these are applied to create hierarchies and exploitation amongst humans and between humans and animals. But someone like me and I think Dead Prez or the MOVE Organization sees an urgent need to focus on human problems, and cannot in good conscience focus on animal liberation alone. Only a very privileged person can afford to only focus on animal liberation, so for a lot of people of the revolutionary African position in North America, that sort of thing is very alien, and rightfully so in my opinion. We don’t have the luxury to focus on one single issue, especially one that is tangential to our own suffering and oppression as black human beings. It all must be included – human liberation, Earth liberation, non-human liberation.

6.You stress the importance of raw food. Can you tell us about it?

Raw vegan food to me is so healthy. It liberates a person from dealing with disease and worrying about health, in large part. I haven’t been even slightly sick in many many years. In the US, especially among African peoples, disease is practically the central concern of life, whether it be obesity, cancer, diabetes, stroke, heart attack, impotence, stress, and so on. Raw veganism, particularly low-fat raw veganism that mainly consists of fresh fruits and greens, is practical, affordable and creative. And it requires discipline and consistency, tendencies that we need as peoples who consider ourselves revolutionary. Raw veganism is both extremely healthy, and also builds people to be more hardcore and serious about life and work. Raw veganism is about vigorous health and uncompromising mentality.

7.Africa is a continent waiting for revolution. Do you think veganism is the key for that?

Yes. Veganism is a potentially important part of revolution everywhere, and we need revolution all over the world. We need vegan warrior spirits that consider the whole picture in terms of how humans coexist in the world with all other beings, while correcting the social contradictions in human society. A more humane society will emerge with veganism in the picture, during and after the revolution. And also a much healthier, just and sustainable one.

ONA MOVE!

-The Precision Afrikan

VeganHood TV!

VeganHood TV

Come and see how to live healthy

Best believe you don’t need to be wealthy

Follow me to the knowledge tree

We just fulfilling the prophecy

And eating what nature’s provided me

>Repeat<

Word, son! This is exactly what I’m talking about. I’ve been checking out VeganHood TV on Youtube for the past couple weeks. They are excellent. Black vegan men in Brooklyn. Showcasing the realness and teaching the family. These are the sort of cats I’ve got to collabo with once I move to BK later this year. They should win awards based on their theme song alone, I love it. When I hear those lyrics my fist is up and my head is bopping. It’s so simple and nice and the beat suggests urgency. Live and direct. Call me mad corny but this is what’s up. So I’m highlighting their work here today, supporting more productive black vegans in the family. I see you! Keep repping the cause.

Black vegan straight-edge vigor forever. Black vegans ain’t going nowhere.

Watch it all right here (what they have up so far, a work in progress):

Episode 1

Episode 2 – part 1 of 4

Episode 2 – part 2 of 4

Also, a revolutionary brother named Safari-Black related to this endeavor posting earlier about the Vegan Hip-Hop Movement:

Vegan and hip-hop are two of my main ingredients in terms of how I’d have to be defined. Vegan Hip-Hop movement? I’m ’bout that.

Okra Stew w/Carrots + Raw Vegan Muscle

The okra addict at it again for no special reason. Okra stew this time with spinach, okra and carrots. Not that all I eat is okra stews, just that it’s always when I make them that coincides with me feeling like pulling my old camera out. Had some very fine carrot/ spinach dishes (don’t know what name to give them) and zucchini pastas over the past weekend and before that.

You know how much “protein” is in that spinach, peeps? How much “calcium” is in that okra? How much “beta carotene” in them carrots? For y’all paranoid nutrient and calorie counters, the low-fat raw vegan/ fruitarian lifestyle is fantastic for the body. It’s been many, many years since I’ve been sick in any way. Never had a dietary deficiency in anything in all eleven years of veganism.

The left upper extremity of the Precision Afrikan doing some cleans and jerks with the 24kg/53lb kettlebell. The muscle fibers below the skin in this image are composed mostly of fruits and greens like spinach. No nuts and few overt fats (avos) and no artificial or concentrated supplements whatsoever other than sunshine, straight-edge living and nutritious foods! And trying to exercise the body-temple every day.

Simple, cheap, effective, sustainable, healthy. Good enough for me and good enough for all others. So to the uninitiated outsiders to veganism who are interested, stop worrying and just live this life.

Misc. – blog post written while listening to Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings’ “Window Shopping” from I Learned the Hard Way. Saw someone doing this sort of thing on another blog, thought I’d try it.

Okra Stew Again, with Cauliflower

Been meaning to post these since I took pics of my dinner one night earlier in May. It’s like the okra stew I presented earlier in the life of this blog, the main solid ingredients this time being chopped-up cauliflower, spinach and okra. The sauce portion, like the earlier iteration, is a lot of tomatoes, habañero pepper (the heat rock!), bell pepper, an onion, some ginger, probably some basil from my backyard, maybe a little cilantro, maybe some curry leaves. I don’t remember exactly since this is from May 5 at a time when I was taking my finals and acing them, and due to neglect, I’m only uploading the joints now. But the pictures speak for themselves. Last week I was messing with zucchini pastas with mad spinach, and tonight I’m thinking about fooling with the concoction below again. Gotta walk down to Oak Tree Rd to my Indian joints, or down to the farmer’s market in Menlo Park Terrace (this is mighty Edison/ Iselin, NJ fools!) to get me that white hard veggie since I forgot to pick some up when I went shopping yesterday. Enjoy the glamor shots below! More later. Questions welcome.

So nice, green and tasty. This is so ill.

Close up for detail.

The black hand of the Precision Afrikan about to deposit this delicious vegan mess into the mouth of the maker. The texture and crunch of cauliflower is too nice to describe. Only the most sophisticated third-world raw vegan connoisseurs can relate to this exquisite experience.

What it Looks Like!

Here are photos of yesterday’s batch of raw okra stew:

And here in my hand is an habañero chili pepper – one of the hottest peppers grown on Earth, or in the known universe. I throw just one of these babies in a sauce, raw. I’ve been known to use two from time to time. It is fiyah.

I call ’em Heat Rocks.

Behold this force of nature.

Raw Okra Stew

Here is my first attempt at putting a recipe into written words:

Raw Okra Stew

All ingredients are fresh raw from the produce stand or farmer’s market!

Chop up:

Buncha Okra (like 2-4 handfuls)

Two Cucumbers

Buncha Spinach

Red Bell Peppers

(you can add or subtract whatever base veggies you want here. Tomatoes, celery, carrots, asparagus, you name it.)

Blend:

Like three or four nice tomatoes

Thumb or two of ginger

A red onion if you’re down with that

One or two habañeros (Jamaican hot peppers) because I like it hot! It’s raw but it ain’t bland son. I’m still Nigerian.

A few basil or cilantro leaves if you like

A red bell pepper

Two or three sticks of celery.

Do:

Rinse everything well.

Get a big-ass bowl.

Chop everything in the chop category into fine chunks the size of the ends of your pinkies.

Put it in the bowl.

Then blend everything in the blend category.

Pour that into the bowl.

Mix all the contents of the bowl for a few minutes until the soup is thickened into a slimy consistency by the Okra. Mix it well!

Eat.

Try this one y’all Afrikan vegans and others out there staying raw and healthy. Let me know how you like this. This is one of my main dinner dishes. I love this.

Food Security and the Last Billion

atakpame-1983Yesterday, Jacques Diouf, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Administration, complained that this year, due to the global food crisis, an additional 40 million humans are joining the ranks of the chronically food insecure around the world, and the total for the seriously at-risk is now at least about 963 million. About 1 billion around the world are now at dire imminent risk of starvation and debilitating malnutrition. Needless to say, Afrikan countries, most run by anti-Afrikan, indeed anti-human kleptocrats and neo-colonialists, serve up some of the highest numbers. Likewise for India, China, and elsewhere in the third world.

Perhaps in the wake of the urgency with which Mr. Diouf testified to the UN’s food agency, now may be a time to muse about the implications of our individual eating habits on global ecology and food security. In what I’ve learned of agronomy, it seems vegetarianism is the most ecologically sustainable diet that human populations can pursue. Even in rural settings, runaway grazing eats up land and depletes its moisture carrying capacity far more quickly than even conventional mono-crop rearing. Eating fruits and using herbs from the forest – minimally invasive in practice – seems like the total opposite of grazing, factory farming, and other practices that have led to extreme deforestation and desertification, including the misguided steps being taken in Indonesia, Malaysia, and elsewhere to convert old-growth broad-leaf rainforest into vast groves of palm oil for bio-fuel export.

I think the Afrikan that moves away from meat is making a profound move. Not only is it in pursuit of the primal health colored folks will need to fight imperialism and neo-colonialism and establish a united Afrika serving and enriching the lives of Afrikans, but it is also an engagement with the carrying capacity of the Earth, and an acknowledgment of the delicate balance needed for the planet to replenish itself. It suggests we are willing to share and allow what the Earth can bountifully give to us, so long as we don’t take in excess and destroy the ecosystem in the process. It is well documented how much more water, land, food and fuel inputs are needed for even modest styles of animal husbandry to feed one individual, compared to inputs needed to feed one person through plant-based means only. At one extreme is factory farming and agribusiness that rapes the Earth without recourse to the least iota of moral restraint, and on the other, I think, the Afrikan moving towards serious raw veganism.

It is a move for the zealots, most will probably conclude. So be it. It tastes good and at least we know we are on Earth’s side, custodians of ecological sustainability and food security, because of our dietary choices. Already there is enough food to feed the world’s population, just that it’s concentrated in granaries in the West, and its potential to be utilized sensibly in Afrika is thwarted by cash-crop export economies, political instability, pollution, war, runaway urbanization, land privatization and land misuse. How much more could the ability to feed the world be expanded if less of us opt for the most wasteful land-use patterns by going for the meat, especially the factory-farmed meat?

Not that the millennium development goals are worth a damn beyond their pretty letters on conscience-appeasing paper, but if we want to take Mr. Diouff’s grievances seriously and consider how we can contribute to food security, even if rather indirectly, perhaps more of us should consider putting the meat down. This is just a microscopic baby-step into being a bit more mindful of the planet and all its resources we usurp to feed us, given the choices we make, even in diet. We haven’t even begun to discuss the fundamental problem of parasitic capitalism and its imposition of hunger, ignorance, land theft, and wretchedness on the “developing” world.

Don’t you get tired of it being the 21st century and black folks (and Asians, Indigenous folk and Latin Americans too) are still starving, still part of the last billion?