Category Archives: vegan

Our first STRAVA KOM – VEGAN POWER

KOM means “King of the Mountain” (QOM/ Queen of the Mountain for female warriors). It means you completed a particular segment over a map with the fastest time while cycling or running on Strava. Of course, KOMs come and go, so it’s an ephemeral milestone until someone else tops it. It’s 12 seconds over the High Bridge going from Manhattan to the Bronx. It’s a tiny sprint segment.

But now a known Vegan has done it. And plans to do more all over the place.

Team Vegan’s got watts! Ride your bike! Use yoru park! Move your body! Fuel your body compassionately and healthfully! Plant-based athletics for sustainable strides and world peace!

Follow me on Strava:
https://www.strava.com/athletes/14854964

Vegan Homemade Muscle-Ups

With vegan power alone, one can perform all essential functions of human life, including muscle-ups, weighted pull-ups, and more.

Make non-violent, sustainable, compassionate, healthy gains!

Go Vegan!

Militant Black Bean Stew (Feeds Vegan Armies)

A militant black stew for vegan soldiers. Soldiers for humanity! What?!? You thought we were only for the animals? Here’s the link to that piece I mentioned from Democracy Now! on slavery in the seafood industry:

http://www.democracynow.org/2016/4/18/is_the_seafood_you_eat_caught

Honestly, you can’t be an environmentalist or a human rights activist and not consider veganism! Livestock and fisheries industries are among the most exploitative and dangerous of all human vocations to human beings and must be abolished ASAP. These industries are the most polluting and climate-change inducing besides. Let’s do without them and evolve as a species already!

This stew had black beans, crimini mushrooms, semi-firm tofu, organic sweet corn, garden peas, broccoli, and zucchini, plus a sauce of eight plum tomatoes, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, fennel seeds, black peppercorn, caraway seeds, hemp seeds, Ethiopian berbere spice, nama shoyu, fresh garlic and ginger, two red onions, and I usually add one red bell pepper but I forgot to get one this time. I think that’s all. Eaten over brown basmati rice.

Leave comments, questions and suggestions down below!

Go vegan!

 

Vegan Long Cycle (Kettlebells)

In which we demonstrate that you don’t need to murder animals to kill kettlebells. This exemplifies the very high-intensity workout called the long cycle, wherein you do as many cleans and jerks of a pair of kettlebells as you can in 1 minute, rest 30 seconds, and do the same with pairs of kettlebells descending in weight. In my case, I start with 106 pounds of kettlebells (pair of 53s), then 88 pounds (pair of 44s), and finally 70 pounds (pair of 35s). I manage to do 19 reps of each. This is cardio warfare and all around great high-intensity training for power, strength and endurance. Good for pretty much all sports and life activities including basketball, luggage lifting, and all around heart and body strengthening. Hardest exercise of the week but most rewarding!

Go vegan! Stay strong! Carb up!

 

Gotham Parks on Youtube for the Latest!

We’ve been focusing on video content, a mix of urban cycling and veganism, on our channel on youtube Gotham Parks. Subscribe and check it out! Here are just some recent offerings:

On my daily fruit smoothies for the workday hours.

 

On some vegan fitness output.

My review of the Xtracycle Edgerunner cargo bike – a great bike for vegans!

 

On traffic crimes in Harlem/ Washington Heights NYC.

 

Running round the park on good friday.

 

On the Queensboro Bridge Bike/ Ped path.

 

Urban bike safety pro-tip.

 

… it’s cheaper to go vegan, whole foods plant-based, in the long run, always!

 

Vegetarianism (including eggs, dairy) is hardly better ethically or health-wise than not abstaining from flesh. Go vegan, all the way!

 

A basic why I’m vegan video.

 

Subscribe to Gotham Parks! I’ll post more to africanvegans.com going forward to keep y’all in the know. Go vegan, ride bikes and enjoy!

Why I’m Vegan

Here’s a little video about why I’m a vegan. Should have shared something like this eons ago… oh well. Also some fitness action to show that cruelty is not required for health and performance.

ONE MORE THING! Check out gothamparks.nycMost new content (in the form of creative writing) from us will appear there, with some strange posts to check out already. Go take a look!

Sixty-Dollar Finger Food

This blog really isn’t about restaurant reviews, but I’m gonna throw this out there anyway, since I recently went with a friend who, like me, just wants to get out the low-down on this joint. Pure Food and Wine, an all-raw vegan gourmet restaurant on Irving Place near Union Square in Manhattan, is a joke. Don’t go there, raw vegans, if you don’t want to get robbed. They charge an insane premium for presentation, prestige and pop marketing, and they don’t even really feed you. Both of us recognized that the food tasted good, but they have you paying around $25 for a plate of grub no bigger in volume than a fist, maybe a fist and a half.

I had the “Zucchini, Local Heirloom Tomato Lasagna” off their menu. Delicious. Cost $24 and it was one small little plate. My friend had the “Sweet Corn and Cashew Tamales with Chili Spiced Portabella” dish. Also delectable and scrumptious. Cost $26 for a single modest serving. And we were told that these were the largest dishes they served. We were far from full after chomping those. Already the money spent would have paid for like seven bags of produce – fruits and veggies – to fill me for days, not minutes. This was the first blow.

Meanwhile, as we ate, we were bumped from our seats so they could combine our old table with others to accommodate a larger party. My friend wondered if they felt comfortable doing that since we were the only Africans at the time in the establishment, but then the house promised us a single desert dish for the inconvenience, and we held them to that. We decided to share the “Pumpkin Cheesecake” dish, worth $15. And we were astounded when they presented this dish to us, a single slice of this mock cheesecake literally two square inches in size. Not making that up – it was a little square like a Rubik’s cube. And a spoon – one spoon – of the faux “brown ale ice cream” that goes with it. Worth fifteen freaking dollars! This was the second blow, the one that truly knocked our heads sideways. Thank goodness that little morsel was on the house!

My friend had some insightful comments about the food culture this represented, a French or European one that valued presentation over everything, over actually being fed. It’s artisanal food. We as Africans, she remarked, could perhaps do a better job of presenting our food, in the broader culinary world. But as a general rule, we serve food to feed each other, to get full. At African households the world over, people are making food and then hollering “come eat!” in whatever language they may be speaking over the sweet or savory aromas of food prepared with a purpose.

I added that this is a result of successful marketing and the brilliant manufacture of taste that is also a part of culture and commerce. Those who have real money to burn – not us, who did this as a one-time excursion with the mindset of culinary students – seem not to mind paying such a great cost to have the experience of “beautiful food” over which only to socialize and make aesthetic remarks. The rest of us just need to eat and sooth our hunger.

I’m not a calorie-counting, portion-size worrying eater. As a raw vegan and a person who lives a physically active lifestyle, I don’t much need to be. I eat when I’m hungry and until I no longer am. So I need to be fed well and good. And the sorts of portions you’ll find at Pure Food and Wine will not do the trick, nor is it worth the money to take a gamble and see if it will work for you – if you’re anything like us, it won’t.

Furthermore, the sort of premiums a place like Pure Food and Wine present are perhaps what can make veganism, particularly raw veganism, unappealing to the everywoman and the everyman out there struggling to get paid by whatever means. An aloof, wealthy, overwhelmingly white crowd hobnobbing over expensive nibble-food turns my comrades and I the hell off, and every other person from the world I know of working-class folk of color. Veganism should look good, taste good, be practical to prepare, be abundant, and most of all be affordable. Fresh fruits and veggies and other healthy plant-based items are still largely unavailable in all the hoods I know around the NYC area. How much of an extreme is it then to take a stroll out of a food desert to downtown to see what veganism looks like as this fancy highfalutin finger-food experience.

So we learned something through the whole affair, and socialized with one another, and made a pleasant evening out of the wallet-vacuuming experience. The flavors presented to us were excellent and unique, inspiring more curiosity about how to combine spices to match or surpass those wonderful tastes.

But we were also reminded that we’re just fine doing things practically, the African way, in which we eat to eat. Any place you go out for food where they charge Fort Knox money for finger food, walk away, walk to the farmer’s market or grocery store nearest you, get whatever healthy stuff you can get, and do something funky-fresh and dope with it in your own kitchen.