Category Archives: fruit

Rolling

Folks want to pick my brain, so I am back. It’s been exactly one year since the last post. I’ve been keeping it low fat raw vegan all the while, doing Afrikan and Nigerian-style recipes for dinner, eating mostly simple, affordable staples like bananas, apples and oranges by day. There are several topics I’m going to touch upon very soon: physical culture and functional fitness, raw veganism and the environment, recipes, and some other things.

Briefly in terms of progression, since I first became a raw vegan two and a quarter years ago, my diet has steadily become a lot more simple and less exotic, besides much lower in fat in the past year. I haven’t eaten nuts in over a year, and have not been to a raw vegan restaurant in the same time span. No durians, no cashews, no cacao, no goji berries. Avocados like once a month. I don’t even eat dates anymore because they’re so damn expensive, especially when I can get like ten pounds of bananas for the price of one pound of dates. Nowadays it’s mostly about spinach, bananas, tomatoes, oranges, okra soups, zucchini pastas, basil and ginger flavored sauces, and so on. So I’ve moved away from so-called “superfoods” and other exotic things. My diet is very pedestrian at this point, the way I like it, and my health is robust. Maybe I’ll progress further in the future towards liquidarianism or something, ala Jericho Sunfire. When I became vegan ten and a half years ago as young teenager I wouldn’t have dreamed of becoming a raw vegan, so who knows? I’ma just keep evolving, getting wiser and stronger.

I vouch for the fruitarian/ low fat raw vegan lifeway. It is easy, it keeps one healthy and vibrant and with a clear smooth complexion and high energy. As a strength athlete I attest that, with resistance exercise, one will have no problem putting on muscle and maintaining tone, definition, or even bulk. This diet is excellent for all natural athletes and even body builders. It is practical because you can find your raw materials in any produce section of almost any grocery or farmer’s market. All raw folks, I encourage y’all to stay raw. To those new to it, begin. Have no doubt and be disciplined.

More later.

The “Lost Crops of Africa”

In my last blog post extolling durian, I asked where all the Afrikan varieties of “superfoods” were at. In exploring the raw vegan/ fruitarian world, one hears much about “superfoods“/ “superfruits” from the tropics, but they mostly seem to emerge from South America and tropical Asia. I hardly found varieties indigenous to or widely propagated in Afrika discussed in the common literature on “superfoods” by the raw vegan popularizers and commercializers of these plants. But in searching for more info on potential “superfoods” growing in Afrika right now, I have discovered a series of books available online: Lost Crops of Africa. You can read it online for free!

The above link is to Volume III: Fruits. Click here for Volume I: Grains and here for Volume II: Vegetables. These as well can be read online for free.

This encyclopedic series of books is answering many of my questions and is shaping how I want to practice agroforestry (and what I’m gonna chew on) in Afrika when I return. Some of these varieties I now want to look into for local availability (in the NYC region). There are Afrikan markets in Newark (Brick City) and the Bronx I’ll definitely want to peak into now to see if they have any of these curious and promising varieties (I’m most interested in what I’m finding in Volume III, followed by Volume II).

So I’m passing on the knowledge. Hope you find this as useful as I do. We need to plant more trees in Afrika – trees like the ones they’re talking about in Lost Crops of Africa. We gotta get extremely serious about land and return as Afrikans living outside the continent. There is absolutely TOO MUCH OPPORTUNITY in all spheres, too much we need to do to revive Afrika, and too little time in our brief-ass human lives.

Let’s study the trees, take a deep breath of the fresh air, pause for the cause in the soaring Sun, and get to work in the soil of our motherland, folks! Where the black botanists and agronomists at?

Tropical agroforestry rocks!
Towards a sustainable Afrikan agricultural revolution and massive reforestation!
Towards the further greening and fruiting of Afrika!
Uhuru!

Food Security and the Last Billion

atakpame-1983Yesterday, Jacques Diouf, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Administration, complained that this year, due to the global food crisis, an additional 40 million humans are joining the ranks of the chronically food insecure around the world, and the total for the seriously at-risk is now at least about 963 million. About 1 billion around the world are now at dire imminent risk of starvation and debilitating malnutrition. Needless to say, Afrikan countries, most run by anti-Afrikan, indeed anti-human kleptocrats and neo-colonialists, serve up some of the highest numbers. Likewise for India, China, and elsewhere in the third world.

Perhaps in the wake of the urgency with which Mr. Diouf testified to the UN’s food agency, now may be a time to muse about the implications of our individual eating habits on global ecology and food security. In what I’ve learned of agronomy, it seems vegetarianism is the most ecologically sustainable diet that human populations can pursue. Even in rural settings, runaway grazing eats up land and depletes its moisture carrying capacity far more quickly than even conventional mono-crop rearing. Eating fruits and using herbs from the forest – minimally invasive in practice – seems like the total opposite of grazing, factory farming, and other practices that have led to extreme deforestation and desertification, including the misguided steps being taken in Indonesia, Malaysia, and elsewhere to convert old-growth broad-leaf rainforest into vast groves of palm oil for bio-fuel export.

I think the Afrikan that moves away from meat is making a profound move. Not only is it in pursuit of the primal health colored folks will need to fight imperialism and neo-colonialism and establish a united Afrika serving and enriching the lives of Afrikans, but it is also an engagement with the carrying capacity of the Earth, and an acknowledgment of the delicate balance needed for the planet to replenish itself. It suggests we are willing to share and allow what the Earth can bountifully give to us, so long as we don’t take in excess and destroy the ecosystem in the process. It is well documented how much more water, land, food and fuel inputs are needed for even modest styles of animal husbandry to feed one individual, compared to inputs needed to feed one person through plant-based means only. At one extreme is factory farming and agribusiness that rapes the Earth without recourse to the least iota of moral restraint, and on the other, I think, the Afrikan moving towards serious raw veganism.

It is a move for the zealots, most will probably conclude. So be it. It tastes good and at least we know we are on Earth’s side, custodians of ecological sustainability and food security, because of our dietary choices. Already there is enough food to feed the world’s population, just that it’s concentrated in granaries in the West, and its potential to be utilized sensibly in Afrika is thwarted by cash-crop export economies, political instability, pollution, war, runaway urbanization, land privatization and land misuse. How much more could the ability to feed the world be expanded if less of us opt for the most wasteful land-use patterns by going for the meat, especially the factory-farmed meat?

Not that the millennium development goals are worth a damn beyond their pretty letters on conscience-appeasing paper, but if we want to take Mr. Diouff’s grievances seriously and consider how we can contribute to food security, even if rather indirectly, perhaps more of us should consider putting the meat down. This is just a microscopic baby-step into being a bit more mindful of the planet and all its resources we usurp to feed us, given the choices we make, even in diet. We haven’t even begun to discuss the fundamental problem of parasitic capitalism and its imposition of hunger, ignorance, land theft, and wretchedness on the “developing” world.

Don’t you get tired of it being the 21st century and black folks (and Asians, Indigenous folk and Latin Americans too) are still starving, still part of the last billion?

Hands-on Avocados

Rushing around Gotham in the mornings, between classes and martial arts sessions and trying to be home for a minute to do less than something, I find a produce vendor on the street – and this man, somewhere on 7th Ave in the 20s, sells the ripest avocados I can find. $1.50 a piece. I pick one up. I buy a few bananas, an apple, a Haitian mango. And a couple big navel oranges. Then I turn up the corner back to school. All the bananas are already eaten by the end of the two minute walk from the vendor to the door of the building.

Yellow peels in hand, I notice our slow-ass elevator lingering up at the seventh floor, so I just walk up to the fifth floor where I can eat and get dirty in that otherwise clinically sterilized environment. Impatient with the slow mechanical lift I rely on my own legs for the flight. I make it up to the fifth floor in no time, and barely winded.

I duck into the men’s room to wash my goodies really quickly. Others look at me curiously, but I don’t care. I haven’t eaten yet, and this morning I was working on Spring Leg No. 4 at the WuSu temple, and I only have twenty minutes during anatomy lecture break to eat all this shit. And I want that avocado the most. I need that filling fatty green fleshy goodness to lubricate and fuel my systems.

All I have is a bunch of napkins from the bathroom. How will I access the cream in this avocado with no silverware or bowl?

I look around. I retreat back into my own mind and see if there are any ingenuity neurons firing around in there. Ahah! I notice one in there, telling me to just use the tools I was born with…

So I start from the narrow top of the pear-shaped avocado with my thumb. I peel off the skin, letting my right thumb part the alligator-like covering from the fresh green flesh – and I get it all off in one piece in about 45 seconds or less.

Others be observing. I’m happy. I got green stuff on my hands and I’m biting into the creamy dreamy avocado flesh. Having consumed the meat, I suck the pit, lick some flesh off my fingers, and move on to the next fruity victim. I’m getting a good breakfast here, y’all.Whatchu care ’bout this young strange Afrikan peeling the skin off avocados like he was born with them in his lap, while y’all is eating unhealthy biscuits and sheeit?

And I eats my Haitian mango like an apple, consuming the skin and everything, and yellow mango juice going everywhere. I can get down with my fruits, and ain’t nothing anyone can do about it, son.

I thank my now advanced avocado-peeling skills to a week of practice. Everyone should try peeling avocados like that, and then just bite into the green fatty goodness like they were meant to.

Word up to my fruits and my wild raw vegans and fruitarians! We savor our healthy fruits like meatheads savor cruel artery-clogging steaks.

To Be Agronomic…

This is actually the only real physical book I took back with me from the classes I took at University of Ghana and Ashesi University in the Spring semester of 2007. This book is Managing Agrodiversity the Traditional Way edited by Edwin A. Gyasi – the professor of the course I took with him, Sustainable Agriculture in the Developing World – and Gordana KranjacBerisavljevic, Essie T. Blay, and William Oduro. This course, a graduate-level class in the Geography department at Legon, was only attended by three students that whole semester – two of us from America (including a white woman from Northern California) and a young Ghanaian woman. It’s troubling, at best, that matters of agronomy, food security, and sustainable land management are not attended to by more students, particularly right in Afrika. But I consider it to have been a great honor to have studied the contemporary thought around sustainable development with Prof. Gyasi.

That is the man himself, during our field trip to Aburi Hills, where we visited Ebua Danso’s farm, the one I mention three posts down, where organic agroforestry impressed the hell out of me and blew my mind. And Ebua Danso wasn’t a master, world-renowned organic Afrikan farmer because of something he learned in a Western-oriented agronomy program somewhere. He was simply reproducing the beautiful and effective methods of traditional, local farmers in Ghana and elsewhere in West Afrika. I come back to all this subject matter and these past events in my life as I reflect on being a raw vegan/ fruitarian, an Afrikan, and a revolutionary concerned with food security, sustainable and plentiful food production and transport, and justice. Raw Vegans/ fruitarians like me eat a lot of tropical fruits and nuts. Bananas produced for the Bonita, Dole, and other big US corporations that maintain banana republics in Latin America – I eat them. I live in North Jersey, just outside NYC where I work and conduct all my business. And I enter the market and select all sorts of tropical fruits that were grown many thousands away, in the very tropics I am native to (and would probably rather be most of the time). If the Afrikan situation was correct, I would be there today with no looking back, doing work, being free, eating right off the land and most likely growing most of my own food. I know activists here in NYC that want to do something like establish organic herbal gardens in Cameroon which will grow medicinal herbs to be exported to the US. Yet the cost of such transport, and the relationship of cash-cropism – an economic practice I approach with some ire – might not be overturned in such an arrangement.

It is likely very impractical to imagine, at this point, a world which, in concern for the pollution and waste of intercontinental food trading – and realizing the injustice of cash-cropism imposed on the (tropical) third world by the (temperate) first world – moves to locovorism, where everyone is eating locally-grown whole foods. In New York state or New Jersey, what do we grow that I dig, apples? A lot of salad crops, yes? Many sorts of berries? Well, that is excellent and I eat the local varieties of those, and have visited apple farms in South Jersey, where I was impressed and felt my innate desire to be a rural, food-growing, simple-ass man, reinforced. But me, I eat a whole lot of tropical fruits. I eat citrus grown in Florida, avocados grown in California (as well as a lot of salad greens), pecans grown in Texas, as for this country. I eat avocados from Mexico, too, Ecuadorian bananas, Brazilian cashews, Chilean blueberries, Peruvian cacao beans, Canadian hemp-seed, Spanish unpasteurized almonds, even New Zealand Kiwis. And that’s certainly not all I eat. I feel concerned about being a non-locovore, a man eating from the global kitchen assembly line established long ago by European mercantilism and colonialism, the antecedents of contemporary cash-cropism. I don’t even eat fair-trade bananas (not even organic).

Does one like me just keep going this way? Agronomy is one of my many, many interests. I’m an urban-ass person, something I can’t apologize for because I was born into that, though I have friends who have moved on from that, and at least tried to dedicate more of their lives to agronomy and food security issues. In the meantime, I suppose we must be advocates for, aside from revolution, or in until its occurrence, clean-green-energy means of international shipping and sustainable locovorism to the extent that it is possible and practical. Surely those in cities and towns with land should say fuck a lawn, and grow food on their free land. Lawns are the invention of retards. Food security is undermined by lawns. Whenever I get a true place of my own, best believe I’ll be growing food on it like a hardcore farmer. But it could be the case, some day down the line, and within the context of repatriating, that I just move to the tropics, to Afrika, where everything grows, and grow durians, pineapples, avocados, mangos, oranges, cashews, cacao, and all that good shit, alongside other Afrikans, a beautiful sista, some little ones, sweating under the palms and sipping fresh juices by the sea (or in the valleys). Ah, to aspire to the good life…

Raw Veganism in Afrika – Could be Ideal (?)

master13_1.jpgI think that the ecological and economic reasons for raw veganism, or even conventional veganism, make it one of the best diets for Afrikans on the continent. Most Afrikans have other ideas, and Afrika might be the continent with the least vegetarians, or at least the fewest conscious vegetarians. A lot of Afrikans see meat as a prestige. It was isolating being vegan in Afrika, and it made me think a lot about how I could spread vegetarianism there, even though I usually never operated as a vegan evangelist before. The sorts of classes I took in Ghana, on sustainable agriculture, women and development, and traditional medicine, all helped confirm for me that we need a vegan movement in Sub-Saharan Afrika. I feel we need to grow all sorts of great tropical fruits and vegetables for ourselves, and eat them. We must move away from cash-crop economies which leave us dependent on the West, and make us import their rotten meat, their subsidized rice, and so on.

 

It is winter in New York, my first winter in two years since last winter I was in Ghana. I have the profound sense of not only missing Afrika, but feeling like I really belong there. I find myself sunbathing almost religiously in this wintertime, since as a very very dark-skinned Afrikan I am supposed to be getting the amount of sunlight I would be getting in the tropics to generate the right amount of Vitamin D. I think I am doing well here because I just sit in the sun whenever it is sunny; I’m sitting in the sun right now. I LOVE THE SUN. I like hot weather. I like keeping my skin melanin-stimulated, dark, black, no matter what time of year or what weather. Raw veganism, fitness, and health all require maad sunlight and fresh air, especially for Afrikans.

 

If I was in Afrika right now, I would be eating maad mangos, Afrikan avocados (whose taste I didn’t allow myself to get used to as I am so accustomed to Mexican/ Californian avocados), maad greens, tomatoes, papayas, guavas, bananas, all the great tropical fruits. Maybe a few raw cashews or raw groundnuts. It would be so easy, as it’s all in the market and is maad affordable, at least to someone who has Western currency.

 

As Afrika moves towards holistic and self-contained economic and health development, perhaps we could begin to grow more of the superfoods of Asia and elsewhere in our vast, rich soils. We could start cultivating durians, certain types of berries, herbs, nuts and seeds. It would be sweet.

 

The practice of pastoralism, the grazing of cattle, sheep, etc., is scientifically proven to be an unsustainable way of life compared to settled agriculture, as the browsers eat away the grasses and help expand the Sahara and other deserts. The consumption of meat is scientifically proven to be able to feed far, far fewer humans than mass vegetarianism would. It consumes far, far more water resources, land, food even, to produce meat than to produce veggies. Our starvation could be stemmed with a lot more veganism, and a lot more macrobiotic, self-sufficient, self-feeding agriculture.

 

And tropical fruits are some of the most heavily relied on ones by raw vegans and fruitarians. Being actually in the tropics would mean easy access to, and ability to grow, our favorite foods.

 

If I return to Afrika, or move there (or to the Caribbean), I would get land and grow maad tropical fruits and veggies, keep the soil well nourished, make babies with a raw-vegan Afrikan beauty queen, practice and teach fitness and martial arts, eat raw vegan stuff, and live a long life as a revolutionary Afrikan renaissance man. I’d learn an Afrikan language, I’d be maad healthy, build an all-Afrikan bicycle factory powered by wind and solar, spread African Internationalism and socialism, etc. But that’s just crazy dreaming. Afrika is grossly underdeveloped and neo-colonized, though we must stand and fight.

 

I visited an organic farm in Aburi, Ghana (north of Accra) where the old Afrikan genius there practices sustainable agroforestry. He plants trees. He plants all sorts of fruits, greens, yams, etc. all around them. He was maad inspiring. The photo above is from his land, the photo below of his contact info. I could do that. I could live like that. We all could. “Make the world a garden…”

 

How I wonder. 

 

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Raw Veganism and Kung Fu

I think raw veganism is probably the best lifestyle for athletes. Check out a black fruitarian fitness trainer here, or here (these sites belong to Richard Blackman and his fruitarian fitness program) for further evidence. In my own experience in being a dedicated student of Kung Fu (Wu Shu) and a raw vegan, my endurance, flexibility, muscle strength, reaction speed, mental clarity, retention, and everything else important to excellence in martial arts, seem at their pinnacle according to the level of study I’m at. The martial artist must be flexible, must be quick on the feet. She must also be compassionate, humble, and straightforward. The artistry of Kung Fu is best expressed, it seems, in those who have moved away from the greed and anger associated with meat. It is also best delivered by those whose bodies are as clean, self-disciplined, and balanced as possible.

I imagine that great martial artists, great Kung Fu generals, also had excellent diets, and maybe some were even some sort of raw vegan, given the vegetarian Buddhist dietary principles followed by authentic monk soldiers. I’m down with that stuff. Living in self-discipline, being clean and healthy, training hard, stretching long, being super attentive, and in a spirit of brotherhood with one’s peers, and diligent humility before one’s teacher. And Kung Fu expresses a deep appreciation for the natural world and the ways and movements of animals, of insects, of birds, even of seasons. I always imagine practicing Kung Fu in great quiet alpine mountains, where it is said in the legends of Zen Buddhism that enlightened monks lived off nothing but berries and got around leaping over cliffs, living over 200 years. For now I live in Gotham City and ain’t going anywhere anytime soon. But the true Zen Masters always stressed that one should be in as complete a state of mindfulness and Zazen in a crowded and noisy market as they would be in the monestary or on a mountain. And it seems to me that one who imitates nature would be most successful to the degree that he leaves it ecologically unharmed as a compassionately meat-free, sustainably raw vegan.

I’ve been a vegan for nearly nine years, and have always been quite healthy. I’ve been a Kungfuista for over seven months and a raw vegan for the past three months, and have never felt healthier. I’m only 24, but I wish other young people could be living close to this experience. In Amerikkka these days, it’s even the young people now that are getting “old people’s” diseases and living sedentary, unhealthy, un-energetic, junk-food lives. I want to get into fasting in the near future to reach an even more serious level of purification, clarity, and energy. In the next few years, I definitely want to begin studying Capoeira as well (I’m too busy with other studies to commit to it right now). Especially as an Afrikan, I really want to master a discipline of my ancestors. And Capoeira acrobatics, and its aesthetics that I appreciate as a lover of dance, should complement the boxing and dancing of Kung Fu beautifully, enabling me to get into some mixed martial arts. Combining Capoeira, Kung Fu, raw veganism, and seasonal fasting should be extremely awesome. And I intend to be living in Kung Fu, raw veganism, and soon, Capoeira, for the rest of my life – raw veganism forever!

Self-discipline incessantly!

Martial arts never die!

I sit in the sun even during winter here in New York. I stay melanated at all times and get my vitamin D, my fresh air, my blameless long walks.

Greens to the Mouth

From my original blog: “Yes I Eat Like a Silverback Gorilla!”

I think raw foodism is correct. This may seem a departure from my usual discussion of Afrikan revolution, but it is not really. The health of the Afrikan – the optimal, primal, longevity-promoting, warrior-class health – is one of my priorities as a revolutionary. I promote martial arts to the Afrikan, for even when it is declared that martial arts is unimportant in modern warfare, I argue that hand-to-hand combat is the foundation of all other aspects of war. It is also an excellent means of preserving the health, balance, harmony, and discipline of the body and mind. For much the same reason I think the Afrikan needs to move away from meat, dairy, starches, and even cooked foods altogether. This is a radical notion for many Afrikans to hear, but there is much reasoning to this. We in the human species should eat living foods rich in vitamin and mineral content, not dead food which in its nutrient-deficient state serves mainly only as filler. We should thus observe the eating habits of our nearest relatives such as the chimpanzee or the mountain gorilla.

I have been a vegan for over eight years, having started at a very young age, and it has been a great experience thus far. But in the last two months I have been experimenting with and transitioning to what is known as a raw-food or living-food diet, of nothing but raw fruits and vegetables. I have also been using raw nuts modestly and having a little flax seed oil, and most recently hemp seed oil, every day. And I have been using some vegetarian vitamin and mineral supplements from the past but I increasingly think they aren’t so necessary in this dietary mode, at least that’s what my body seems to be hinting at me. And in this mode, with the living enzymes of raw fruits and living greens, there is a very marked difference in how I feel in the deepest ways, compared to my physiological state under cooked-food veganism, not that before this all I ate was cooked foods. But now the appetite is more self-regulated and moderate, since my body is acquiring all the nutrition it needs and is no longer hungry so much. I can eat a bunch of fruits in the morning and a large salad of lots of greens and some more fruits in the early evening, with a handful of nuts sprinkled throughout the day, and I am good to go, feeling light, fully alive, fully aware, completely awake, and ready for war.

The cooking of food naturally kills the food, just like fire will kill skin cells and eventually kill a person. And we are the only species on Earth that cooks anything! Eating dead things including dead meat is not natural to our physiology, which with our long intestines, alkaline saliva, dull teeth, flattened nails, and so on, suggest a vegetarian persuasion similar to the other primates. The discovery of fire with which to apply to food is argued to have occurred relatively recently in human history (last 10-20 thousand years). Thus before the imposition of that custom over our dietary lives, human history was possibly predominated by raw-foodism, with the eating of various herbs, fruits, seeds, nuts, stems, roots, and leaves that were encountered by pre-modern people. And these foods, being alive and thus containing the energy and magnetism associated with living things, gave us thorough nourishment wherein we didn’t feel much need to overeat, nor did they leave us with weak immune systems.

The psychological effect of raw-foodism is significant. The mere elimination of meat can bring about serious changes in consciousness wherein one being removed from the immense suffering of animal slaughter has a clearer mind and often can exhibit more compassion not only towards animals, but towards fellow humans. It is often remarked that the mark of how a society treats its people is found in how it treats its animals. So a more purposefully and consciously vegetarian society can potentially be a much more humane society.

Beyond this, with the living cells and enzymes present in living uncooked greens and fruits, exclusive of any cooked food to weigh one down, one feels much more fully alive, which makes perfect sense given the consumption of non-dead things. I have heard that the level of electro-magnetism in the bodies of raw-foodists is measurably much higher than that of people eating cooked food. The creativity levels, stamina, clarity, and so on that I have been experiencing since moving more squarely into a raw-foodist practice force me to conclude that living food is what the human body truly wants.

It seems like a no-brainer though. Soft drinks? Sweets? Chemical food colorings, drugs, sweeteners, etc? Processed foods? Empty starchy grains? Bread? Meat or dairy of any kind, or the milk of non-humans (which is strictly meant for infantile non-humans)? Food cooked to the point of killing it and the enzymes which are supposed to work in our bodies to provide complete oxygen and nutrition to our cells? All these things to me seem deviations from the human blue-print, even though most humans are living like this. Having lived in Afrika, I notice that so much of the diet there is empty-calorie filler starches, whether in the form of fufu, corn, etc. We Afrikans have the shortest lifespans and the highest susceptibility to many diseases, so we should be able to be open-minded enough to review our dietary practices even though they may be centuries old. Whether on the continent or in the diaspora, we should experiment with more living foods. A lot of leafy greens are added to stews in Nigeria, but perhaps they should be eaten raw. Increasingly, that’s how I’ve been doing it lately, and I feel all the stronger, more alive, and more kingly for it. Yes I eat a lot like a silverback gorilla. But that’s our cousin, living high in the Rwenzoris, in the mountains of Eastern Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda, laughing at us from his perch while we slaughter each other and die unnecessarily of malnutrition. Maybe we can learn something from him. There is a great case to be made, after all, that humans are not the most evolved species, and we should humble ourselves to study from and respect the lives of other species. This is even a principle of Kung Fu, my current martial arts practice.

Towards Afrikans moving away from empty starchy cooked food, greasy soul-food, and other unhealthy practices, and into raw and live veganism!