Raw Veganism and Kung Fu

I think raw veganism is probably the best lifestyle for athletes. Check out a black fruitarian fitness trainer here, or here (these sites belong to Richard Blackman and his fruitarian fitness program) for further evidence. In my own experience in being a dedicated student of Kung Fu (Wu Shu) and a raw vegan, my endurance, flexibility, muscle strength, reaction speed, mental clarity, retention, and everything else important to excellence in martial arts, seem at their pinnacle according to the level of study I’m at. The martial artist must be flexible, must be quick on the feet. She must also be compassionate, humble, and straightforward. The artistry of Kung Fu is best expressed, it seems, in those who have moved away from the greed and anger associated with meat. It is also best delivered by those whose bodies are as clean, self-disciplined, and balanced as possible.

I imagine that great martial artists, great Kung Fu generals, also had excellent diets, and maybe some were even some sort of raw vegan, given the vegetarian Buddhist dietary principles followed by authentic monk soldiers. I’m down with that stuff. Living in self-discipline, being clean and healthy, training hard, stretching long, being super attentive, and in a spirit of brotherhood with one’s peers, and diligent humility before one’s teacher. And Kung Fu expresses a deep appreciation for the natural world and the ways and movements of animals, of insects, of birds, even of seasons. I always imagine practicing Kung Fu in great quiet alpine mountains, where it is said in the legends of Zen Buddhism that enlightened monks lived off nothing but berries and got around leaping over cliffs, living over 200 years. For now I live in Gotham City and ain’t going anywhere anytime soon. But the true Zen Masters always stressed that one should be in as complete a state of mindfulness and Zazen in a crowded and noisy market as they would be in the monestary or on a mountain. And it seems to me that one who imitates nature would be most successful to the degree that he leaves it ecologically unharmed as a compassionately meat-free, sustainably raw vegan.

I’ve been a vegan for nearly nine years, and have always been quite healthy. I’ve been a Kungfuista for over seven months and a raw vegan for the past three months, and have never felt healthier. I’m only 24, but I wish other young people could be living close to this experience. In Amerikkka these days, it’s even the young people now that are getting “old people’s” diseases and living sedentary, unhealthy, un-energetic, junk-food lives. I want to get into fasting in the near future to reach an even more serious level of purification, clarity, and energy. In the next few years, I definitely want to begin studying Capoeira as well (I’m too busy with other studies to commit to it right now). Especially as an Afrikan, I really want to master a discipline of my ancestors. And Capoeira acrobatics, and its aesthetics that I appreciate as a lover of dance, should complement the boxing and dancing of Kung Fu beautifully, enabling me to get into some mixed martial arts. Combining Capoeira, Kung Fu, raw veganism, and seasonal fasting should be extremely awesome. And I intend to be living in Kung Fu, raw veganism, and soon, Capoeira, for the rest of my life – raw veganism forever!

Self-discipline incessantly!

Martial arts never die!

I sit in the sun even during winter here in New York. I stay melanated at all times and get my vitamin D, my fresh air, my blameless long walks.

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3 responses to “Raw Veganism and Kung Fu

  1. what style of wu shu do you train in? are you an angoleiro or capoeirista? i’ve been studying white crane chin na, of and on, for a little over a year. what capoeira school are you with?

  2. I study Wu Su Kung Fu at Alan Lee’s school – http://www.kungfuwusu.com/ – where Northern and Southern styles are blended. I have now been training for over nine months. As for Capoeira, I have just recently joined Edna Lima’s Abada Capoeira school – http://www.abadacapoeira.com/html/home.shtml – and I train twice a week in Capoeira and twice a week in Wu Su, totaling four days of training weekly right now. The Abada system is supposed to blend Angola and regional styles.

  3. edna is off the chain. i was studying with mestre jao grande. we definitely need to build. i’m sending you an invite to http://www.soulvegfolk.com

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